New Ways to Make Journalism Pay 2012:

A Freelance Lifeboat in the Perfect Storm

The Speakers

Dave Boyle leads on media co-ops for Co-operatives UK. He is the author of Good News: A Co-operative Solution To The Media Crisis. He is also a writer, researcher and consultant, having worked recently for the Guardian, the High Pay Centre and Liverpool FC, as well as smaller community enterprises as part of the Co-operative Enterprise Hub business advice network. Previously Chief Executive of Supporters Direct, the body which helps sports fans turn their clubs into co-operatives, he blogs at daveboyle.net and @theboyler on Twitter.

Fiona Cullinan is now a freelance digital journalist (fionacullinan.com). She has worked in journalism for 25 years, mostly as a freelance magazine sub-editor. She's seen computers come in and the Internet arrive but still has a typescale and casting-off tables on her shelf. Crossing over to editorial digital work in 2000 as a web producer for Freeserve, she then moved into customer publishing and now creates multimedia content and oversees editorial quality for brands. She runs digital skills training workshops in London, and every Friday she trains herself in new digital skills using café wifi and cake, www.firehead.net/professional-development-and-training/how-i-teach-myself-new-digital-content-skills-using-cake

Tim Dawson, www.tim-dawson.com, is a reporter and feature writer whose work has appeared in The Sunday Times for the past 15 years. A former Scotland correspondent for the New Statesman and reporter for the US magazine People Weekly, he edits ">www.cycling-books.com and teaches the NUJ professional training course Making Internet Journalism Pay. With Alex Klaushofer, he co-edits www.newmodeljournalism.com and co-wrote the new NUJ/ALCS ebook Help Yourself: New Ways To Make Copyright Pay.

Max Glaskin is a feature writer and author "specialising in what interests me". Currently it's cycling science but in 27 years it's included brain surgery, rocket science, interior decorating and walnuts. He's written features for New Scientist, Reader's Digest, the nationals, consumer magazines, B2B and corporates, and for English-language clients on four continents. A member of the NUJ since being indentured on the Wrexham Leader in 1980, he tweets at @cyclingscience1, uses Facebook as Cycling Science, receives spam at max@pavilion.co.uk, unsolicited sales calls on +44 7981 490516 and has condensed his life into one webpage, tinyurl.com/2bscut, "which wasn't hard to do". He's just written a book called Cycling Science, published in the US on 2 November 2012 and in the UK on 1 May 2013. He points out that "The spelling differs between the editions - so you'll want to buy both".

Peter Kirwan is a journalist and publisher who writes about media and marketing for the Guardian, Press Gazette, Media Briefing, journalism.co.uk and Wired. He observed the original dot.com boom at close quarters as the editor of Computing, a B2B weekly for IT professionals. After that, he set up Fullrun, a subscription-based web site for marketing professionals in the tech industry. These days, he cross-subsidises his journalism (most of it focused on media finance) by working as a writer/editor/producer/researcher for large tech companies.

Alex Klaushofer is a freelance journalist writing on social and current affairs in Britain and the Middle East. She has contributed to the Guardian, Reuters, BBC Radio and many other outlets, and is author of Paradise Divided: A Portrait of Lebanon. She provides writing, editing and training services via www.theideascribe.com. She is co-founder of www.newmodeljournalism.com,which covers pioneering business models for journalism, and co-authored the recently-published ebooklet, Help Yourself: New Ways To Make Copyright Pay, sponsored by ALCS and available on the members' section of the NUJ website.

Una Murphy is co-founder and publisher of the online social affairs magazine www.viewdigital.org. A journalist and producer/director, she has worked for UTV, BBC, TG4, RTE, The Irish Times, The Examiner and The Irish News, as well as media campaigns for Save the Children and the Centre for Ageing Research and Development in Ireland. She is a member of the Media Trust and has set up networking events between journalists and voluntary and community organisations in Belfast. As an independent film-maker she has produced/directed documentaries on subjects including Orange history in Cork and Ireland's first international pop star, Bridie Gallagher; one of Una's commissioned films is on the list of recommended training resources for NHS Cancer Care Groups.

Hina Pandya had formerly worked in the US as a model maker at Industrial Light and Magic (George Lucas' FX house) for special effects on film and commercials, then at ABC News in London - before writing policy for UK Government bodies promoting police oversight and development in international aid. Wanting to change the world of course and finding policy a poor tool to do it with, in 2008 she took her writing skills to freelance journalism. Not sure that she can claim this move has helped the world be a better place, but she has been published by The Economist, Running Fitness, Mercury Records, Def Jam Records, View London, the Times Educational Supplement, and many online publications including her own blog and more recently Universal Channel. Contact twitter: @hinapublish, email: hinapublish@gmail.com.

Christian Payne is what's known as an "early adopter". Originally a professional photographer for the UK dailies, he diversified to become the social technologist known as @Documentally and is one of the freshest and most dynamic voices exploring new and social media. Having spent years experimenting online, he now talks and gives workshops internationally, around mobile media-making and social media practices. Past projects include documenting the plight of Iraqi refugees for the United Nations; video blogging for the British Council in Pakistan; and working alongside Reuters on groundbreaking projects with the UK's political leaders. Christian champions story-making with mobile devices and, although a card-carrying member of the NUJ, prefers to be called a blogger rather than a journalist as he shares his content across multiple platforms. See some of his social media platforms at Documentally.com.

Guy Smallman is a freelance photojournalist and TV documentary producer specialising in political and social issues. Since 2008 he has completed a dozen assignments in Afghanistan, never embedded and always working outside government structures; he was the only journalist to visit Granai, scene of the biggest massacre carried out by NATO forces since the war began. His photographic exhibition on Afghanistan is currently touring the country. Search with Google for 15millionafghans to see his documentary on unemployment in Kabul. He also covered the Pakistan/Kashmir earthquake (2005), and the Lebanon war (2006). His documentary Into The Fire about the lives of refugees in Athens should be online before the conference and he may make an interesting announcement about something else entirely on the day. Contact guy@guysmallman.com, see www.guysmallman.com.

Michelle Stanistreet is general secretary of the National Union of Journalists and represented her members at the Leveson Inquiry. She worked for ten years at the Sunday Express newspaper as feature writer and books editor and was MoC at Express Newspapers. In 2006 she was elected NUJ Vice-president and was President from 2007-8. In April 2011 she became the first woman in the NUJ's history to be elected as General Secretary.

John Toner is Freelance organiser of the NUJ. As a trainee journalist, he joined the union in 1980 and was elected Father of Chapel (FoC) for the first time a week later. This might have been at the root of his editor's hostility towards him. He worked on provincial newspapers for 16 years, during which time he served on the NEC and held almost every position in the Union. Since 1996 he has worked for the NUJ, first as North of England Organiser and then as Freelance Organiser from 2001. During his time in the Freelance Office, John has seen a burgeoning of the issues facing freelances. The basic piece of advice he would give to every freelance is: "Get it in writing".

Arum Wajid is a broadcast journalist and freelance media ethics trainer.

Mark Watts is the Editor-in-Chief of Exaro, the investigative website. He is the co-founder of the FOIA Centre, which specialises in research using "open-access" laws; and he is a journalist, author and television presenter. He ran the investigations unit at Sunday Business as its chief investigative reporter. He has worked as a reporter on several national newspapers, including The Sunday Times, The Independent on Sunday, The Sunday Telegraph and Sunday Express. He also worked on World in Action and other television current-affairs programmes. You can contact Mark via news@exaronews.net; or 020 3137 8894;or 07973 720315;or visit the website www.exaronews.com.

Huma Yusuf is a freelance journalist and a former features editor for the Pakistani daily Dawn. She won the European Commission's Prix Natali Lorenzo for Human Rights and Democracy Journalism in 2006. Her work has appeared in the International Herald Tribune, Christian Science Monitor, Indian Express, Tehelka, Foreign Policy, and New Republic.

Session Chairs

Janet Awe is a freelance writer, PR, marketing and social media consultant, with nearly 20 years' experience in the communications industry. Contact: @AwesomeComms / janet@awesomecomms.com.

Adam Christie is the NUJ's job-share vice-president, National Executive member for Yorkshire and the North East, and Freelance Industrial Council vice-chair (he produces and updates the Freelance Market Monitor). He sub-edits on the Yorkshire Post, produces a regional magazine for the TUC's unionlearn section, and works with several non-profit organisations. He was a BBC regular on regional Ceefax, then Online, Radio Leeds and Look North until the budget cuts got him! As editor of Leeds branch newsletter for many years, he reckons: "Chasing stories and envelope-stuffing has given me a unique view of changes in journalism, seeing where the jobs are and who has them."

Jon Holden is a freelance broadcast journalist and photojournalist. He works mainly for the BBC, writing the news for network radio. He spent five years in local newspapers before joining the BBC and working as a reporter and producer in both radio and TV. After leaving the BBC, he worked as an assistant organiser at the NUJ. He has now returned to journalism as a freelance, and has also been sub-editing on a national newspaper. You can contact Jon at jon_holden@hotmail.com.

Barry McCall is a Dublin-based freelance journalist - a writer, editor and copywriter with extensive experience in national newspapers, magazines, public relations, broadcasting and online media. He specialises mainly in business, finance, science and technology and is a regular contributor to The Irish Times as well as a number of specialist magazines and online publications. An NUJ activist for more than 30 years, Barry represents the Republic of Ireland on the National Executive and was elected president at Newcastle Delegates Meeting in October.

Fiona O'Cleirigh is a freelance reporter working for Exaro News, the investigative online journal. Previously wedded to Middle Eastern media, the Northern Ireland political scene is fast becoming the other woman. She edited the memoirs of Lord Laird, a former MP in Stormont, and is working for Global & Western Publishing on two books on land ownership. The Second Domesday - on Victorian land holdings in the UK - is available from early December. fionaocleirigh@gmail.com.

Roger Prentis works as a freelance editor, specialising in business publications. He also works online with social media as a contributor, adviser and consultant.

 
Site map

Posted: 01 Nov 2012; Last modified: 14 Nov 2012

Send design comments to:
web@londonfreelance.org
© 2012 NUJ
[NUJ.LFB home]